Tag Archives: Jane Austen

Sanditon by Jane Austen and Another Lady

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Sanditon is the novel Jane Austen was working on when she died. I believe she started writing it in January 1817 and wrote 11 or 12 chapters before stopping in March 1817, either because she got sick of the story or became too ill to continue. Jane Austen died 18 July 1817.

The story was not published until 1925, but the version I read had been completed by ‘Another Lady’ and published in 1975. I look forward to finding similar continuations by other authors to see where they take the story.

Jane Austen sets up the story with a husband and wife, Mr and Mrs Parker, travelling on a poor country road when their carriage overturns. The Heywood family come to their rescue and insist on the Parkers staying with them until Mr Parker’s injured ankle has recovered. Once it has, the Parkers continue to their home at Sanditon, taking with them Charlotte Heywood.

Sanditon is Mr Parker’s pride and joy. Old Sanditon is a small village near to the sea, although it is tucked away and protected from wild weather. New Sanditon, where the Parkers live, is right on the sea and Mr Parker has the intention of turning the town into a fashionable seaside resort with the assistance of Lady Denham, a wealthy neighbour.

A number of characters are introduced, including Miss Brereton, who is beautiful, young and poor and a much put-upon companion to Lady Denham, Sir Edward, who is Lady Denham’s nephew, a handful of other young women on the lookout for a husband, and more of the Parker family, including Mr Sidney Parker, who Charlotte found to have “a decided air of ease and fashion  and a lively countenance.” Mr Sidney Parker is also exactly the right age to emerge as the hero.

The Parker family are the funniest group of hypochondriacs ever written about. A letter read aloud by Mr Parker from his sister had me in stitches. The letter told all about everybody’s ailment; poor Susan had been suffering from the headache, and when ten leeches a day didn’t help, her sister Diana, the letter writer, convinced Susan the problem was with her gums, and so she had three teeth pulled. Diana advised that Susan’s “nerves are a good deal deranged. She can only speak in a whisper and fainted away twice this morning on poor Arthur’s trying to supress a cough.” I know Jane Austen meant for me to laugh until I cried when I read this.

Jane Austen’s work finished with Charlotte visiting Lady Denham, and reflecting on the irony of a large portrait over the fireplace of her second husband, (Lady Denham became a ‘Lady’ when they married), and a tucked away miniature of her first husband, Mr Hollis, from whom she got all of her money. In Charlotte’s words, “Poor Mr Hollis! It was impossible not to feel I’m hardly used: to be obliged to stand back in his own house and see the best place by the fire constantly occupied by Sir Henry Denham.”

We will never know where Jane Austen would have taken the story of Sanditon next. Plenty of characters had been introduced, Charlotte was clearly the heroine and there were some interesting events ticking away in the background. If Mr Sidney Parker wasn’t to be the hero, there was the promise of some friends of his arriving soon.

‘Another Lady’ continued the story quite well. There were a few red herrings regarding relationships (Emma set the precedent with Jane Fairfax and Mr Churchill), a villain who behaviour was far more melodramatic than any of Jane Austen’s own villains (think Mr Wickham from Pride and Prejudice, Mr Willoughby from Sense and Sensibility, Henry Crawford from Mansfield Park or John Thorpe from Northanger Abbey) and several characters who were quite nasty (Lady Catherine de Bourgh from Pride and Prejudice, Mr and Mrs Eton from Emma with a special mention to Mrs Norris from Mansfield Park).

The story finished on a high note with all of the mysteries being satisfactorily resolved and all of the appropriate couples either coming out into the open or realising their love for each other, although my biggest complaint about ‘Another Lady’ is that Charlotte and her hero went on and on and on about how much they loved each other once they finally got to that point. Seriously, they ‘lovey-dovey’ bits went on for pages, with Charlotte and her chap telling each other when they first realised they loved each other and how they thought that the other person did not love them, and how much they loved each other, and so on (and on and on and on, as I already said). Jane Austen would never have done that. Once her happy couples had no more misunderstandings about their feelings for each other, she politely left them on the page and in our imagination.

‘Another Lady’ continued the story in a good match to Jane Austen’s style and language. It wasn’t really obvious to me that the story had been finished by someone else other than a few clunky sections and the ‘lovey-dovey’ ending.

I’m sure other readers would agree with me when I say that if any more of Jane Austen’s works were ever to be found, it would be a dream come true.

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Me and Mr Darcy by Alexandra Potter

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I haven’t read anything I’ve really enjoyed for ages. I’m bored with ‘Literature,’ tired of mysteries and crime and can’t be bothered with romance. There is obviously something wrong with me, because I don’t even feel like looking at photos of cakes in cook books.

Sometimes when I feel jaded, reading something light and bright cheers me up. I was hopeful that Me and Mr Darcy by Alexandra Potter would work, but unfortunately this book has also gone onto the list of books which I found a bit blah.

Emily Albright is an American who loves Pride and Prejudice. She impulsively decides to go on a guided tour of Jane Austen country and finds herself on a bus full of old ladies, an elderly male bus driver and a young, cute but arrogant, male journalist.

I might as well stop telling the story right now, because I expect you’ll be able to figure out how this one ends.

Possibly I’m not being fair to this author as I’m a bit tired lately, (long hours at work), but I truly wish I hadn’t wasted the hour I actually spent reading this book and the half hour I spent skimming through the remainder of the book, (just to make sure of the ending).

I know I have said this before, but I have to stop reading Jane Austen Fan Fiction. It’s too much like having a drink of water when you really want a frothy hot chocolate with marshmallows and cream. No more! (Until next time).

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Northanger Abbey by Val McDermid

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Northanger Abbey by Val McDermid was written as part of the Austen Project, where contemporary authors re-write Jane Austen’s six major novels. This author is well known for her crime novels, which are very good.

I quite enjoyed Val McDermid’s version of Northanger Abbey, but I did finish the book feeling slightly disappointed, as I always do after reading Jane Austen tribute novels, or sequels or whatever they are called. Nobody writes Jane Austen like Jane Austen. Still, I keep picking these novels up because I’m not ready to let go of my favourite author.

This version of Northanger Abbey is set in Scotland in the present time. Cat Morland, a 17 year old, home schooled, would-be-heroine, goes to Edinburgh for the festival with her wealthy neighbours, the Allens. In a whirlwind of social engagements, Cat meets and becomes besties with Bella Thorpe, who is keen on Cat’s brother, James. Bella wants Cat to fall in love with her brother Johnny, however Cat is already sweet on Henry Tilney, a young lawyer.

Cat becomes friends with Henry’s sister Ellie, both of whom appear to be bullied by their widowed father, General Tilney.

Really, I don’t know why I am telling you all of this. The story is the same as Jane Austen’s, just set in the present time. The characters have Facebook and mobile phones. Cat’s reading of choice features vampires, zombies and werewolves. Cat and Bella use expressions such as OMG and LOL. The faults and failings and the good points of the characters haven’t changed since the original Northanger Abbey. Cat is naïve and Ellie is sweet. Bella Thorpe is still a young woman on the make and her brother Johnny remains a jerk.

However, I have the same problem with Val McDermid’s version of events that I do with Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey. Why would a young man, specifically Henry Tilney, who is a lawyer, fall in love with and remain in love with, a 17 year old girl? I think the age differences and intellectual differences between Catherine and Henry are too great for their relationship to work in real life. I can understand Henry’s initial interest in Cat’s pretty face and her lovely personality, but at some time in the future, he is going to be bored stupid with her. And then what? In Jane Austen’s time they would politely have lived separate lives, with Henry finding his amusement elsewhere, but in the present time, Henry would eventually move on and Cat’s heart will be been broken.

Regardless of my fault finding with the plot, I did enjoy this novel and would recommend it to fellow Janeites. In future though, I would prefer to read a Val McDermid crime novel though than her re-telling someone else’s story.

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A Modern Day Persuasion by Kaitlin Saunders

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Do yourself a favour Janeites, re-read Jane Austen’s Persuasion instead of A Modern Day Persuasion, An Adaptation of Jane Austen’s Classic by Kaitlin Saunders.

This book needed a good, hard edit. Some famous writer or other (Elmore Leonard, to be precise) said that the trick to telling a good story is to leave out the boring bits, and someone should have told this author. There is far too much guff about what kind of tea minor characters drink, and lunches with celebrity cousins who aren’t interesting. Boring stuff that doesn’t move the story along doesn’t belong in the final cut.

To make matters worse, the grammar and punctuation are poor. I’m not an expert, far from it, but these sort of faults are annoying.

The author is also guilty of telling rather than showing the action.

As I said earlier, a reader will get far more pleasure from reading or re-reading Persuasion. However, if you really want to know what happens, seventeen year old Anne Elliot falls in love with twenty year old Rick Wentworth, a poor lifesaver. Too young to get married, they are parted by Anne’s family and godmother, who believe she can do better than Rick.

Years later, Rick returns to the area as a rich and successful novelist. Anne must have been living under a rock, because she had no idea what Rick had been up to during their time apart. (Seriously? You expect me to believe that?In this day and age, if you were still in love with an old flame, wouldn’t you Google them once in a while? I would. Also, Rick is a bestselling writer. Jane Austen heroines read. I found Pride and Prejudice and Zombies to be more believable).

Blah, blah, blah. Anne’s car breaks down, blah, blah, Anne’s nephew fell out of a tree, blah, blah, Anne has a haircut and makeover, blah, blah, enter Will Elliott, blah, blah, Rick thinks Anne is in love with Will, blah, blah, blah, fireworks, happily ever after. The reader probably fell asleep hours ago.

This book has cured me for the moment of Jane Austen tribute novels.

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Captain Wentworth’s Diary by Amanda Grange

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Sigh…(of happiness). Captain Wentworth’s Diary by Amanda Grange left me feeling as if all is right with the world.

First, a disclaimer: Persuasion is my favourite Jane Austen novel, and Captain Wentworth from Persuasion is my favourite Jane Austen hero. As you might expect, Anne Elliott from Persuasion is my favourite Jane Austen heroine. To re-visit their story in Captain Wentworth’s Diary was an unexpected pleasure.

In my opinion, Persuasion is the ultimate romance novel.

The plot summary of Persuasion is as follows. The major characters meet, and fall in love, only to be separated by reasons beyond their control. Now, pay attention to the next sentence everyone, because this is the reason why Persuasion is so wonderful. The separated lovers do not stop loving each other. They meet again, many years later, and after a series of misunderstandings, re-unite. At the end of the book you just know they are going to live happily ever after.

Captain Wentworth’s Diary tells of how he and Anne Elliott first met and fell in love, and is told via Frederick’s diary entries. Persuasion, by Jane Austen is told through Anne Elliott’s eyes and Anne and Frederick have already parted by the beginning of the story.

Frederick’s diary entries show him to be young and girl crazy, a sailor on shore leave who has his money burning a hole in his pockets. The reader knows Frederick will become a good  and successful man, as he is kind and straightforward, and most importantly values Anne, who is not treated with love or respect by her father and sister. Anne is clever and funny and pretty blossoms with Frederick’s attentions. During his visit to Somerset, she and Frederick become friends and eventually fall in love.

Despite agreeing to marry Frederick, Anne is persuaded by a family friend to break her engagement, so as not to hold him back in his career. There is also an element of snobbery in Anne’s friend’s advice not to marry him, as Anne is a Baronet’s daughter, and her friend believes Anne could do better for herself than a sailor.

When they part, Frederick, who is heartbroken and bitter, goes back to the Navy to make his fortune during the Napoleonic Wars. At this point in the story, Captain Wentworth’s Diary merges with Persuasion. Frederick returns eight years later as a rich man to Somerset, where he meets Anne again. Despite recognising that he still loves Anne, Frederick flirts with and considers marrying other girls. The girl he favours is headstrong, a characteristic Frederick believes is important, in light of Anne having been persuaded not to marry him. Frederick is compromised by the girl he has been flirting with and thinks he will have to marry her, but luckily for him she falls in love with someone else.

The next obstacle to Anne and Frederick’s happy ending is Frederick’s belief that Anne is to marry her cousin, who is to inherit the Baronetcy on her father’s death.

Frederick and Anne’s eventual realisation that they still love each other, have always loved each other and that they should have fought harder for each other in the beginning is satisfying but bittersweet.

Based on my enjoyment of Captain Wentworth’s Diary I will read more books by Amanda Grange and I would highly recommend this book to fellow Janeites.

 

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The Darcy Connection by Elizabeth Aston

The Darcy Connection

Warning! Warning! Jane Austen is my favourite author. Like many other Jane-ites, I am a sucker for novels written by other authors who take minor characters from Jane Austen’s novels and use them to write their own books, although I draw the line at spin offs with zombies.

The Darcy Connection by Elizabeth Aston is a misleading name for this novel, which takes characters from Pride and Prejudice, as none of the Darcy’s appear as characters in the novel at all, despite playing pivotal roles.

The Darcy Connection is actually all about Eliza Collins, who is the youngest daughter of Mr Collins from Pride and Prejudice and his wife Charlotte. Eliza’s character is quite like Elizabeth Bennet’s, in that she is lively and clever and far more interesting than her older sister, Charlotte, who is extraordinarily beautiful. (Charlotte Collins must have been adopted, as neither of her parents, according to Jane Austen, were physically attractive. Mr Collins was described as tall and heavy and Charlotte Lucas as sensible and intelligent looking. I’m positive Charlotte would much prefer to have been described as pretty, but Jane Austen did not give her that gift).

The story begins with Eliza’s romance with Anthony Diggory, who is the son of the local squire. Mr Collins is now the Bishop of Ripon, but he is quite poor and Anthony’s father, Sir Roger Diggory, wants a richer wife for his son.  Instead of sticking up for his daughter when Sir Roger accuses her of trying to ensnare his son, Bishop Collins does his best to appease Sir Roger and agrees to send Eliza away somewhere where she can not make “sheep’s eyes” at Anthony.

Charlotte (Eliza’s sister, not mother) has a rich godmother, Lady Grandpoint, who has arranged to take Charlotte to London for a season. Because she is so beautiful, Charlotte is expected to find herself a rich and aristocratic husband. Lady Grandpoint agrees to take Eliza with them also, although she points out that she can not be expected to fund Eliza’s visit. Eliza goes along to London unwillingly as a poor relation to Charlotte.

The story borrows slightly from Cinderella at this point. Lady Grandpoint spends a great deal of money on Charlotte’s clothing and appearance in order to attend society functions, where she very soon begins to win the hearts of eligible suitors.

Eliza, when she does attend parties, is dressed in unsuitable and unfashionable clothing, and is snubbed by a new acquaintance, Mr Bartholomew Bruton, who Eliza overhears calling her a “provincial”  in a manner reminiscent of Mr Darcy calling Elizabeth Bennet “tolerable.” Luckily Eliza’s resourceful maid knows where to buy affordable fabric and creates dresses which show Eliza to her best advantage. Eliza wows Mr Bruton when she appears at a function beautifully dressed, something which would have been far more satisfying than being thought clever.

The story has adventures and scandals, love affairs and even a duel. There are plenty of twists and turns in the plot to keep things interesting, even though, let’s be honest, it is at heart a romance novel. There will be a happy ending, even though Caroline Bingley makes an appearance and guess what? She is still mean.

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